Find Out More About the Members of the Board of Directors for the Arthritis Foundation, Eastern Pennsylvania Chapter

  


Mike West

Chair, Board of Directors

The Rothman Institute


Q: What does being involved with the Arthritis Foundation mean to you?

A: Actively participating in our communities to educate people regarding Arthritis and ways they can assist in completing its mission.


Q: What is your favorite Arthritis Foundation moment, event or accomplishment?
A: The Jingle Bell Runs


Q: What do you think is one of the greatest challenges the Arthritis Foundation faces?
A: Unfortunately arthritis it is not identified as one of the “top tier conditions,” like heart disease and cancer. That means that we have to work hard to get the message out about how seriously arthritis affects those in our community.


Q: How did you get involved with the Arthritis Foundation?
A: My chairman was given an Arthritis Foundation award

 


Charles E. Danihel  


Q: What does being involved with the Arthritis Foundation mean to you?
A: I have enjoyed my association with the Arthritis Foundation representing the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. The rewards of working with Camp JRA staff and seeing the campers grow, mature and develop interpersonal relationships that will last a lifetime are indescribable. The camp experience lets them realize that they are not alone and the mentoring and supportive role models of the counselors and staff allows them to see that it is possible to find their way in this world and do what they want to do.


Q: What is your favorite Arthritis Foundation moment, event or accomplishment?
A: My proudest and most favorite moment was when my wife and I were recognized at the recent Evening of Honors program and presented the 2011 Lillian Feola Arthritis Hero Award. It meant a lot to both of us and renewed our commitment to the Arthritis Foundation.


Q: What do you think is one of the greatest challenges the Arthritis Foundation faces?
A: I think the biggest challenge is getting the recognition that Arthritis is a disease that affects all ages and that we need to do something so that research becomes more important so that treatment is available to all affected.


Q: How did you get involved with the Arthritis Foundation?
A: Years ago I was asked by my local Independent Order of Odd Fellows Lodge to stop by the Foundation office and find out about a Telethon that our National headquarters was asking us to participate in. Once I walked in the door, I haven't walked out and the Odd Fellows have been supporting the Foundation in many ways.

 


 

Jessica Sharp

Maven Communications


Q: What does being involved with the Arthritis Foundation mean to you?
A: For me, involvement with the Arthritis Foundation means educating the public about a diseases that most people think is inevitable as they age. Raising awareness that there are so many forms of arthritis, that kids get arthritis, and that some arthritis is preventable, means that I can hopefully make a difference in both the lives of those with the disease, as well as those who are uneducated about it.



Q: What is your favorite Arthritis Foundation moment, event or accomplishment?
A: My favorite AF moments are the volunteer recognition events. I inevitably get teary eyed every year hearing someone's personal story of how they've done something way above and beyond to make a difference. It's really an inspiring event.


Q: What do you think is one of the greatest challenges the Arthritis Foundation faces?
A: Raising the awareness level of arthritis to that of other chronic diseases.


Q: How did you get involved with the Arthritis Foundation?

A: I got involved with the Arthritis Foundation through my good friend Wade Balmer, who works for the AF. He and I met in college and when the AF marketing and communications committee needed some members, he asked if I was interested in joining it. I've been involved ever since.


 

Raphael DeHoratius, MD

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.


Q: What does being involved with the Arthritis Foundation mean to you?
A: Participation means giving back to the patients who have given me so much over the years. They have been courageous, sad, hopeful and grateful over the years but always positive in their attitude to their disease.

 


Q: What is your favorite Arthritis Foundation moment, event or accomplishment?
A: The most memorable moment for me was the institution of the fellows educational program as chairperson of the professional education committee of the local arthritis foundation.


Q: What do you think is one of the greatest challenges the Arthritis Foundation faces?
A: As the economy languishes, donations will decrease from members and donors alike. The Foundation will need to be innovative in fund raising to just keep even with the past let alone increases in the future.


Q: How did you get involved with the Arthritis Foundation?
A: The Arthritis Foundation was a supporter of my early career in medicine through grant support. This along with the help provided to patients has endeared the Foundation to me.


 

Gary Owens, MD


Q: What does being involved with the Arthritis Foundation mean to you?
A: It means using my medical knowledge and business connections to further the mission of the Foundation. It also gives me personal satisfaction to work with this great organization.


Q: What is your favorite Arthritis Foundation moment, event or accomplishment?

A: Most definitely it is hosting the volunteer recognition event. The volunteers have the best stories and seeing them in person and sharing those stories is a wonderful experience.


Q: What do you think is one of the greatest challenges the Arthritis Foundation faces?
A: Our biggest challenge is getting funding to further our mission of reaching more people.


Q: How did you get involved with the Arthritis Foundation?
A: The then current President and Board Chair visited me after I had completed the Leadership Philadelphia program and expressed interest in the AF due to my interest in the disease as a physician.


 

Dennis Mooney

Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate

Wilkins & Associates


Q: What does being involved with the Arthritis Foundation mean to you?

A: An opportunity to give something back to the community.



Q: What is your favorite Arthritis Foundation moment, event or accomplishment?

A: Chairing the Arthritis events was a very fulfilling experience.



Q: What do you think is one of the greatest challenges the Arthritis Foundation faces?

A: Funding is a challenge for any group in this economy.



Q: How did you get involved with the Arthritis Foundation?

A: I was asked to chair a golf tournament in 1996 and then was asked to join the board.


 

Gene Hong, MD

Drexel University College of Medicine


Q: What does being involved with the Arthritis Foundation mean to you?

A: It means helping to improve the care of arthritis and arthritis related conditions, and ultimately helping to improve the health and wellness of patients and communities.



Q: What is your favorite Arthritis Foundation moment, event or accomplishment?

A: See below for how I got involved. I've fortunate to have several memorable and "aha" moments working with the AF.



Q: What do you think is one of the greatest challenges the Arthritis Foundation faces?
A: Awareness of arthritis and arthritis related conditions, and it's importance and impact on the lives of patients, families and communities. We need to raise the level of awareness and concern among healthcare providers as well.



Q: How did you get involved with the Arthritis Foundation?
A: I was asked to give a talk at a large conference hosted by the AF here in Philadelphia on musculoskeletal medicine and medical education. From there I think it was helping the chapter to organize and put on a medical conference for the Philadelphia Department of Health physicians. This led to being on the Medical Advisory/ Professional Education Committee, to chairing the committee, and to being invited to be on the Chapter Board.

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